leia

We had a close encounter with a Black Widow spider today

93 posts in this topic

Actually yesterday since it's now 12:27 a.m.

I had never seen one closeup - or even from far away - and had no idea the red hourglass shape is so pronounced.

By close encounter I mean each of us had our hand within six inches of it before we knew it was there.

I took a photo of it but I couldn't get the hourglass to show up clearly in the picture.

It looked exactly like this one:

HGymz.jpg

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You're both very fortunate it was not a brown recluse.

Seriously.

I'm actually surprised you found a BWS outdoors and in daylight.

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I used to catch them in jars, when i was about 9 years old, where we lived in Vernon Canada, they were all over the place. I don't even think I knew they were poisonous at that time, but naturally protected myself from it, they are really pretty, but deadly.

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brown recluse.

brown-recluse-spiders.jpg

Non red alarm lable....just a yucky brown spider,

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The spider I would never wanna run into is the camel spider, from the middle east.

2007_June_Camel_Spider3_small.jpg

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You're both very fortunate it was not a brown recluse.

Seriously.

I'm actually surprised you found a BWS outdoors and in daylight.

I'm fairly certain I was bitten by a brown recluse back in the Midwest several years ago.

I put my hand into a box of Christmas decorations and within about an hour my hand started to blister and then swell up. I went to an immediate care center the next morning and they said it looked like a brown recluse spider bite and prescribed Keflex.

Re: day or night - I didn't know they had a preference. It was lurking in the indentation on a cast-iron type outdoor chair. Actually, I wasn't even certain there were any around here but now I know!

Shewolfe, I agree - they are really attractive as far as spiders go and I felt kind of bad killing it - or having Yeasty kill it - but since it had taken up residence in a chair with cushions and since are dog is always outside it went to the great web in the sky.

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The spider I would never wanna run into is the camel spider, from the middle east.

2007_June_Camel_Spider3_small.jpg

:twitchy:

Are they venomous?

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The spider I would never wanna run into is the camel spider, from the middle east.

2007_June_Camel_Spider3_small.jpg

camelspidersmall.JPG

Yeah.

NO joke.

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The spider I would never wanna run into is the camel spider, from the middle east.

2007_June_Camel_Spider3_small.jpg

:twitchy:

Are they venomous?

Nah, apparently they don't really hurt ya. They say the bite hurts though.

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Just in case anyone missed the actual SIZE.....

camelspidersmall.JPG

They're HUGE....

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I read somewhere they they run at ya at tremendous high speeds, on their freaking hind legs, hissing.

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Oh my God.

If that isn't the stuff of nightmares I don't know what is!

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I read somewhere they they run at ya at tremendous high speeds, on their freaking hind legs, hissing.

.... and on that note, I am off to go have nightmares.

:hello:

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7OMW4.gif
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Me too, gnight all! :)

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But this is right up there in terms of the too close for comfort willies:

Several species of black widow spiders are common in North America, but in the Western United States, the only species is the western black widow, Latrodectus hesperus. Its habitat ranges from British Columbia to Mexico and throughout the Rocky Mountains to the western portions of the Great Plains.

In California, it is a common desert spider that is able to survive very hot, dry conditions. However, black widows also can be found in mountainous terrains above the 5,000-foot elevation in Southern California where snow covers the ground every winter. Outside of California, they are common in urban Colorado and in Central and Eastern Washington state.

Because the holes, cracks, crevices, trash, and clutter associated with human structures attract the western black widow, these spiders are often very common around homes, barns, outbuildings, and rock walls. In supportive habitats, a mature female can be found every few feet.

This one was lurking in a crevice in the patio furniture.

I'm constantly pulling off/dusting off spider webs.

Time to spray around the outer edge of the house.

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I read somewhere they they run at ya at tremendous high speeds, on their freaking hind legs, hissing.

.... and on that note, I am off to go have nightmares.

:hello:

Good night, Grump.

Thanks for the fellowship. :stoni3:

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Nobody ever believes me when I say this, but I'll keep saying in because it might help somebody sometime. If you get bitten by a venomous spider, taking massive amounts of vitamin C in the 10 grams + range per day will greatly limit the spread of the venom, thus limit the size and scope of damaged tissue and support rapid healing of the damage that does occur.

If you don't have the C in your tissues to neutralize it, the venom continues to eat its way through your muscle and tissues for days.

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